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Question Sand carved and Graphic blast ADA signs

Discussion in 'General Signmaking Topics' started by sfcurcio, Jan 27, 2020.

  1. sfcurcio

    sfcurcio New Member

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    Our shop is looking for more ways to create ADA signs for institutions where they do not want applique letters and raster Braille beads. I had come across two other techniques - sand carving and graphic blast. I am familiar with sandblasting signs, but never heard of using the method to make ADa signs with Braille. Can some enlighten me on the process?
     
  2. GaSouthpaw

    GaSouthpaw Active Member

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    I would personally be very reticent about calling them ADA signs, since the requirements are so vague and strict at the same time.
    I mean, for signs that don't require tactile lettering, you could probably do a sandblasted sign, but you'd have to leave a raised area for the Braille to sit in. And since the US requirements for Braille are very specific, calling for "a domed or rounded shape" (so, despite what the manufacturers might claim, photopolymer signs don't meet those requirements), so the raster bead method is the most efficient way to do Braille. If you have a router with 3D carving capabilities and want to spend the time doing the programming to get the required results, you could try it that way, but there's no way that'd be faster than using the raster method. Oh, and it would still have to have the correct finishes and contrast.
     
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  3. Cory Marcin

    Cory Marcin Member

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    I agree with Southpaw.
    Is there a specific reason the customer doesn't want applique letters and raster beads?
     
  4. Gino

    Gino Premium Subscriber

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    I don't think it's really a need for new creative ways to make ADA signs, as the codes and rules are very strict and explicit as to what you can and cannot do. Being creative might make for a very nice looking sign, but I doubt someone wants to get a splinter or not know what they're reading by hand. The rules are very specific so that regardless of where a person of needs is, they know precisely what to feel for. Your idea could be somewhat confusing.... introducing new backgrounds and features to something which has been standardized for about 30 years.
     
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  5. sfcurcio

    sfcurcio New Member

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  6. GaSouthpaw

    GaSouthpaw Active Member

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    I wasn't aware that's what those were called, so I learned something. Still, that Braille is not compliant, at least not as the ADA requirements are written (the domed line I quoted above is straight out of the reg). The letters pass because they don't have sharp edges (even though a few of the examples don't have compliant fonts).
    Now, I've always heard that there aren't a lot of inspectors, so the chances of someone getting busted for having non-compliant signs is slim. I also know I wouldn't chance my reputation on it, or the resulting lawsuit from the customer that did get busted.
     
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  7. sfcurcio

    sfcurcio New Member

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    The architect's requirement is that the Braille and letters be "an intrinsic part of the sign and cannot be removed." This is needed in locations where the signs could be vandalized. All of the bids documents we received for schools have this mentioned in the description.
     
  8. MikePro

    MikePro Major Contributor

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    sandblasting to create braille? interesting, never heard of it but the pics prove it is possible to do.
    +1 to learning something new everyday, I actually just saw a video of a UV printer building-up the 1/32" characters & braille & colorizing everything in one-go.

    I still don't see why the rasterbraille wouldn't be acceptable, but if you're looking for options then photopolymer ADA signage would also fulfill that requirement of intrinsic-ism.
     
  9. sfcurcio

    sfcurcio New Member

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    I am wondering how costly in time and labor as opposed to using a router and raster machine.
     
  10. Andy D

    Andy D Very Active Member

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    sfcurcio I wouldn't waste my time with mohawk, they are slow and
    expensive. I sent you a message with info on a much better vendor
    that I use everytime I can ( I have no other affiliation with them)
    BTW sand-carved is pretty standard, it just means the sign is made out of
    one solid piece, & doesn't have glued together pieces that can fail.
     
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  11. sfcurcio

    sfcurcio New Member

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    OK, thanks. How about thermoforming the signs?
     
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