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Versacamm and a Mac?

Discussion in 'Roland' started by Bullzeye, Apr 3, 2007.

  1. Bullzeye

    Bullzeye Member

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    Mar 8, 2007
    Hello,
    Looking into purchasing a computer now to run this 540 versacamm. this is what i am looking at-

    Mac 24-inch 2.16GHz Intel Core 2 Duo SuperDrive
    1GB (2x512MB) 667MHz DDR2 SDRAM (PC2-5300)
    250GB Serial ATA hard drive
    Slot-load 8x double-layer SuperDrive
    NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GT with 128MB GDDR3 memory
    Built-in AirPort Extreme and Bluetooth 2.0
    Built-in iSight Camera and Apple Remote

    What would you guys recommend? I have always designed on a mac although I am familiar with a pc. I am sure this has been discussed 1000 times, but want to target the versacamm owners specifically . What do you guys think and what works great for you? any problems with running the versacamm on a mac? and what software works best with the rip program. Thanks!!!
     
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  2. quikseps

    quikseps Member

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    Although I'm very new to this....I'm very experienced with the computer end of things. First of all...Versaworks requires a Windows based machine to run. Due to the nature of this program...which is basically a RIP, I wouldn't count on it running correctly on the Intel based Mac with Windows installed on that Mac. RIP's can be very quirky and problematic.

    So, you'll need a PC to drive that RIP for the Versacamm although you can still design on the Macintosh using your favorite software.

    Also...get more than 1GB of RAM for the machine running Versaworks. These files can be enormous so I would advise 4GB.

    Steve
     
  3. Bullzeye

    Bullzeye Member

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    Mar 8, 2007
    thank you, exactly what i needed
     
  4. Mac34

    Mac34 Member

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    I design on a Mac, then transfer over to my PC. I've been on the same design software forever, and rarely have the time to learn anything new unfortunately. I'll create a design, save it, transfer it to a thumbdrive, pop it in my PC, my Mac Reader easily brings it into Flexi, I select my colors, gradients, etc., and then print. I know its alot of steps, but it really isn't that bad. I learned on a Mac, love it, and never a virus :)
     
  5. Checkers

    Checkers Very Active Member

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    As it's been mentioned, the more ram you can afford the better off you are. I would suggest a minimum of 2 gigs.
    The other suggestion I would make is to have at least 2 hard drives. However, more isn't necessarily better here. While it is better to have 2 or more hard drives because "scratch disks" make your programs run faster, larger drives can hurt your processing speed.
    A silly way to look at this is try to imagine finding one specific penny out of a stack of 250. While the chances are you'll find it before looking at all 250 of them, you still had to search through quite a few. Now picture the same scenario, however, you only have to look through a stack of 100 this time.

    Checkers
     
  6. mediaman

    mediaman Member

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    Feb 6, 2007
    Brian,
    Excellent point. I usually partition my large externals to 100 gig sections. This may help speed up the processing time when pointing the RIP to a specific "drive" or partition.
    Mac34,
    Though I am tempted by the new Intel Macs, I have never had a virus on a Wintel box and I do not limit my internet use in any way.
     
  7. quikseps

    quikseps Member

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    If you're that concerned with the processing speed of the PC used to drive your printer, the best advice is to keep that computer strictly for running the RIP and not to use it for other work....ever. Also, for the ultimate speed configure this computer with 2 internal hard drives as a "RAID Level 0". This type of configuration splits the data and any scratch disk usage between 2 disk drives essentially doubling the read, write speed. This type of systen with 4GB of RAM is "extremely fast" and mostly used by hard-core gamers but is also in use at most service bureaus which process large files.

    I don't recommend partitioning hard drives. First, it doesn't increase its read or write speeds, that's a myth. Secondly, and most importantly, if a partitioned drives data such as directory tree structure becomes damaged, its more difficult for a utility program to repair it. Basically, partitioning hard drives is no longer needed or desired with modern equipment.
     
  8. Techman

    Techman Major Contributor

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    This was a good point... That is until the speeds of drives got to where they are now.
    Todays drives with fast search technology access data so fast that you cannot notice and difference any more. But You will notice a difference in files being delivered thruogh the "bus". No matter how fast your drive is,, it cannot deliver data any faster than what the bus allows. This is where it makes all the difference. A 533 bus is noticably slower than a 800 bus.


    Its nice to see someone who knows the facts.. In the old days...Partitioning hard drives came about when OS could not access huge drives. So drives were cut up.. This habit still comes around from those who really are not up on the newest technology.
     
  9. mediaman

    mediaman Member

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    Thanks for the tip on partitioning (or not).
     
  10. Bill Modzel

    Bill Modzel Active Member

    It's too bad that there aren't more Mac RIPs. Caldera Graphics is one and I'm running an old, (running in classic mode), PosterJet RIP on my Powerbook G4 which is a loaded multipurpose Mac. It routinely crunches 180MB files while running Illy, Photoshop and whatever else I'm using. In fact, it takes longer for my HP5000 to check it's printheads than it does for the RIP to send the data.
    I read all this about dedicated pc's to run a rip and just don't understand why this is necessary if my lowly loaded Powerbook can do it.
    I'm considering adding an HP9000 to our arsenol too and am facing the same issue as you, having to add a pc to run Onyx. I'm waiting for a confirmation that PosterJet has finally been upgraded to run on OS X rightnow and talking to Caldera also.
    I know you windos guys don't understand us Mac diehards but we read these boards and are constantly amazed at all of the issues and problems that are discussed all the time. I'm not saying we don't have issues but it's scary world to look at from our side of the fence sometimes and we'd rather not go there if we don't have to.
     
  11. Checkers

    Checkers Very Active Member

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    Just thinking out loud here...
    Perhaps another option for you mac heads is to consider purchasing a printer with a built in rip? I would assume that it will eliminate the need for a dedicated rip.

    Checkers
     
  12. mediaman

    mediaman Member

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    Feb 6, 2007
    What printers come with a built-in RIP?
     
  13. adamfilip

    adamfilip Member

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    im running versaworks via Parallels on several Imacs and never had an issue..
    just allocate enough ram and your fine
     
  14. FatCat

    FatCat Very Active Member

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    I agree, both Parallels and Fusion are very good emulation programs. In fact, I've heard nothing but praise from even my die-hard PC friends who tried it. I can't say I've ever tried to run Versaworks, but I can't imagine why it wouldn't work as long as you can hook up the printer with a USB cable.

    Also, Apple offers the bootcamp option where you can do a hard reboot directly into Windows. However, I hate the hassle & time wasted of shutting down and rebooting into another OS.
     
  15. Versacamm and a Mac!

    I've used Parallels/XPxsp3/VersaWorks for about a year now. The only problem I have is my ethernet port does not work on my Mac so I'm forced to use wireless - which works great for everything except large files.

    I have a new Mac now though and have XP loaded - what are the steps to install VersaWorks and have it print to my VP-300 vis ethernet?
     
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