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Wanting to build a new table...

Discussion in 'General Signmaking Topics' started by Knep, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. Knep

    Knep Member

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    Jan 30, 2010
    Indidna
    I want to do atleast a 4x8, really 4x16...what kind of surface should I use so that I can use a Big Squeegee to laminate smaller stuff till I get a Laminator?

    Thanks for any info :)

    Mike
     
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  2. Jim Doggett

    Jim Doggett Very Active Member

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    Thick, clear(ish) PVC is the bomb. We sold it when I was with Yellotools (www.yellotools.com) and it is on a roll so you can go seamless to 4' x 16'. You can also print a grid to go under and then flip the mat when it wears (years of life on each side).

    Yellotools USA might be able to fix you up. http://www.yellotools.us/shop/index.php?cPath=41_34
     
  3. HaroldDesign

    HaroldDesign Very Active Member

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    As flat as possible. Look into any local companies that are getting rid of layout tables (steel or otherwise). That may be overkill, but would be perfect if you can get them on the cheap.
     
  4. dasnootz

    dasnootz Member

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    I'm in the process of building a new table now myself. I'm leaning toward using MDF. I'm going with 18' long, but doing it as an 8' table and a separte 8' table that's 2' away. When I need the full 18' I can put a 2' insert down to bridge the gap, but it will allow me to not have to walk around the entire table if I have to answer the phone, grab something from the other side, etc.. I got the idea from another sign shop. When you're not using the full 18', you have two separate 8' work stations, which is great if you have an employee or partner... or you can have two different 8' projects set up at the same time.

    I like MDF because it's so dense and heavy. It won't move when I'm putting in gromits. Plus you can route the edges down so it's not sharp if you have to pull banner or vinyl over the edge.
     
  5. Pat Whatley

    Pat Whatley Major Contributor

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    We currently have three tables. A 4x8, a 4x16, and a 4x24 that are currently covered with Upson board (don't ask, you don't want it). I'm going to rebuild them all in January to better serve what we do now.

    I'm replacing the plywood top on the 4x8 with a 1/2" teflon cutting block ($70 and will last forever).

    The 4' x 16' that will primarilly be used for mounting and laminating is going to get two sheets of 3/4" mdf. The stuff is as flat as you can get, I plan on mounting them then fiberglass filling the seam and sanding it smooth.

    The 4x24 will get recovered with 1/2" black ABS plastic, mainly because it looks cool as snot, won't warp, and will look cool as snot.
     
  6. threads1

    threads1 Member

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    I just built 2 - 4 x 8's with 1/2" glass tops and on rollers. The glass is the bomb if you want to pay. It's tempered and a stainless blade wont scratch it if you don't bear down real hard. With the rollers, I get the 16' when butted together and out of the way when I need room for a vehicle.
     
  7. phototec

    phototec Very Active Member

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    Belton
    I wish Signs101 had a resource section

    Man, I really wish Signs101 had a resource section, you know, like a shop production section broken down by items like shop tables, vinyl racks, vinyl application ideas, etc. If someone was interested in building a shop table, they could go to that section, and it would have nothing but photos and or drawings showing different shop table and how to build them.

    Like this site:

    http://www.binkyswoodworking.com/


    I would even volunteer to create down-loadable PDF data sheets of each project, like the attached pdf file.

    Jon
     

    Attached Files:

  8. anotherdog

    anotherdog Very Active Member

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    I too have to build a couple of 4x8 and 5x10 tables myself. I have built them in the past but after a few years they always warp. Anyone have some good table plans?
     
  9. Mosh

    Mosh Major Contributor

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    Nerbaska
    Go 5x10 at least and put a cutting board on top. No questions asked!
     
  10. artbot

    artbot Very Active Member

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    Houston TX
    i've got 4 5x5 tables that i call "hover tables" similar to giant air hockey tables. like a omnidirectional lazy susan.

    although that set up has worked well for positioning sheets for polishing etc, my next try is to build two 5x10 aluminum rotisserie tables. so i can tilt the work toward me. clear coating large sheets is a pain because i can't ever seem to evenly spray the last foot of the sheet. and you just can walk over or spin the last part.
     
  11. Sticker Dude

    Sticker Dude Member

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    Florida

    That would be an awesome section Lets work on that guys and gals!!!
     
  12. davidcarr87

    davidcarr87 Member

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    has anyone started a poll yet??
    i vote yes!! :p
     
  13. Rising

    Rising Member

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    Jim That looks excellent, dont know the actual product material name do you? Would like to find it here in UK

    Steve
     
  14. Jim Doggett

    Jim Doggett Very Active Member

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    Hi Steve,

    CuttingMat Crytsal is what they call it in Germany. Not sure about UK dealers, but they have English-speakers in the Windeck office:

    info@yellotools.com
    http://www.signmaking-superstore.de/shop/index.php/language/en/cat/c34_Cutting-Mats.html
    +49 (0) 22 92–921 928

    Good luck. It really is a wonderful cutting surface. No blade-steer, self-healing and the graduated "shore" (spelling?) provides the perfect blade penetration. Cutting is just so smooth and easy. And it's seamless up to pretty remarkable sizes.

    Best,

    Jim
     
  15. shakey0818

    shakey0818 Active Member

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  16. Brandon708

    Brandon708 Very Active Member

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    Orland Park, IL
    That looks like a great product. Are those prices per liner foot in US Dollar prices?

    anyone use this matt?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  17. ChiknNutz

    ChiknNutz Major Contributor

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    I built a 4x8 and 5x10 out of standard lumber, the tops done in 1/2" or 5/8" thick plywood. I then bought LDPE (low-density polyethylene) cutting mats that are commonly sold at sign supply places to cover them with, worked well.
     
  18. SameDay Signs

    SameDay Signs Member

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    tiffin ohio
    I would suggest building atleast a 5' wide table. I always worked on a 4 footer but having the extra 1' is great to have a little more room
     
  19. MetroSigns

    MetroSigns New Member

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    @Pat: Any chance of getting pics of your tables? I would like to see how they are made.
     
  20. TheSellOut

    TheSellOut Very Active Member

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    Here is a 5x10 that I just built pretty much out of scraps from around the shop. I put 3 2x4 light fixtures in it and covered it with a piece of glass that I got from a storefront that replaced all their windows. It's not tempered but it's doing the trick for free for now! If I get a chance here soon I will try and set up some building plans for it. The light table really comes in handy!
     

    Attached Files:

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